Printmaking techniques

Lino Printing

Lino printing is a form of block printing, so called because you use a block (of lino or wood) and carve into it. Once your design is complete, you roller your ink on to the areas that are left raised and print your picture. It is very versatile and can be used with both fabric and paper to make many interesting projects.

 

 

 

 

Screen printing

Screen printing utilises a wooden or aluminium screen that has a fine fabric tightly stretched over it. The design is then cut out, often from paper, and placed underneath. Ink is placed along the top of the screen and dragged down over the screen, it goes through the mesh and onto your paper. The stencil that you previously cut out then acts as a barrier, so that part of the design is left blank.

 

 

 

 

Collagraph printing

Collagraph printing is a wonderfully versatile technique that can produce many interesting effects.  Items like card, textured paper, fabrics, or found objects are glued to a board. Paints and fillers can also be used to add pattern. When varnished and dry, the plate is inked. You can either print in the lino method (from the raised parts) , or from the intaglio method (wiped off the raised parts but left in the recesses) to produce very different prints.

 

 

Drypoint Engraving

Drypoint engraving is one of the 'Intaglio' types of printmaking, Intaglio literally meaning 'to carve'. Where-as in block printing you print from the areas that are left raised, with intaglio, the ink comes from the recesses that have been engraved. Copper or zinc are often used as the plate in drypoint, but you can also get excellent results from acrylic and cardboard. The design is scratched onto the plate with a sharp dry point then ink applied over the surface. The excess is rubbed away, leaving it only in the design. With damp paper and pressure the drawing is forced out onto the paper.

Examples

Screen printed image

This is a two colour (using two separate screens) print.

Lino print

This is a lino print. You can do other colours on a different lino or a 'reduction' print where you carve away more from the same block for other colours.

Drypoint etching

This is an example of a drypoint, you can use one colour or mixed colours on the same plate.

Collagraph

This is an example of a collagraph, like etching, you can use one colour or mixed colours on the same plate.